800+

I’ve usually tried to make mention when we hit numerical milestones, here at Earth Images. Our 800th post was reached some time ago and I actually never even realized it. Today’s post brings Earth Images to 808.  I think I am confident when I say, there will not be another 800 articles yet to come, although I think I made such a statement after 300 posts.

Point of view can make or break an image. Got to love the angle that Laurie Rubin takes with this equine friend. I also like the fact that the background is evident, but minor in the composition. Laurie’s lens choice has everything to do with that.1Look Up ©Laurie Rubin_LAR2945

Dande el King produced this very effective picture of two horses, sharing a moment. Don’t you just want hug the little one and give the grownup an apple? The background in this image appears similar to those you would get with a 1971 portrait done at Sears, but it works nicely. I am guessing it was produced after the fact, while sitting in front of a computer.

As occasionally happens, the credited name for this image shows no links in a Google search whatsoever. I will continue to show images credited to people with no apparent internet presence, although I would prefer to share a link with you.2Alaa Aomrel Dande el king

Marina Scarr created this endearing image of a Snowy Plover and her eggs. The point to the picture was to warn people to be careful of eggs on the beach in certain regions of Florida. Knowing Marina I am sure, she took much care with her subject, and not to attract attention to what she was doing.3Marina Scarr Snowy Plover

I keep returning to Guy Tal for his masterful abstract interpretations of the land. This is yet another powerful example of his use of light and shadows.4Guy Tal

This is a great example of an image that could have been made thirty years ago, or yesterday. Silhouette sunrises/sunsets that are dripping with natural color were once a sort of specialty of mine, and I am always on the lookout for those who do it well.  Michael Frye is one such photographer.

Sunset, Middle Gaylor Lake, Yosemite NP, CA, USA

Sunset, Middle Gaylor Lake, Yosemite NP, CA, USA

William Patino provides us with an image that represents the modern vision of a sunrise/sunset, and it is beautiful too. Either graduated neutral density filters (and old concept), or HDR imaging ( a newer idea) was employed here to hold detail in the foreground. Nicely done.6William Patino

Sea caves make for great photos and Rafael Perez has given us a beautiful view of a wonderful cave.7Rafael Perez

Sea caves are one of the many natural wonders I would have liked to have photographed, but missed.

Well there are views….and then there are views. The view alone here is great, but how about a little lightning to spice it up? This is another William Patino picture and he deserves a special thanks from me for helping to make today’s post rich in visual wonders.8Cathedral storm Kiama William Patino

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The Beat Goes On

Those of you who know me, and have read this blog for a long time, also know that I am not shy about offering up my opinions. I have opined on social issues, politics, sports, religion and more. I do not consider my opinions more important than those of others. I write them because this is my forum, and I have something to say. I stand by the opinions I have offered, but acknowledge that there have been times that my wording, was born out of anger, and has lacked in the wisdom I purport to possess. That is sometimes also true of my personal correspondence. I am always sorrow filled when I step over that line.

Earth Images has been, and always will be centered on the subject of photography first, and nature second. All other subjects will follow. That is partially because my love for those things is a very old love. Nature has been an ongoing theme in my life since I was a four-year old boy wandering around in the fields (and lakeshore) near home. I loved sports but for me, that subject was never even close to exploring nature. I made my first serious photographic images in 1971 and I never stopped until the summer of 2014.

Recently some of my writings have been centered on my walk with God. Those writings are not about religion. Religion is a creation of man, man is a creation of God. I try to remain faithful to my God, not to religion.  I am still looking into starting yet another blog, where that subject, with a little politics thrown in, is the theme. I have more to say on this subject than any other I have ever broached. It is more important to me than any other subject on earth. It deserves its own home. If I complete the project of another blog, I will put the link up here.

I will continue to bring you the work of other photographers here at Earth Images. The world never stands still, and constantly re-sharing my old pictures does not show my appreciation for what this new generation of photographers is accomplishing. It would be hypocritical of me to do anything less than share their work. I will of course, fill in the empty spaces, with occasional posts that contain my old work.

In my last post I wrote about the subject of technology,  (GPS in this case) and how it affects personal freedom, and specifically the artful joy of wandering and exploring. The quote below was published on Facebook by Guy Tal, the creator of the beautiful image of light and shadow in today’s post.  This Rollo May quote echos my sentiments perfectly.

Technology is the knack of so arranging the world, that we do not experience it. Rollo May

I appreciate each and every one you,                                                                                        Wayne

 

 

 

 

 

 

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