Adventure & Diversity

If there’s anthing that makes a photographer complete, it is being willing to keep an open mind as far as the subjects photographed, and the style in which they are created. Diversity of subject, style and viewpoint, not only keeps photography fresh, but it keeps photographers fresh. You will never tire of image making, if you always have the wonder of what you will find over the next hill, and how you will react (view) to it.

Diversity has become a societal buzzword, but it has great value in the attitude of the photographer.

The images below are varied in their locations and styles. Each and every photo (I believe) has something to say about the photographer, and the viewer (us).

This is certainly a classic sort of landscape image. A country church surrounded by the land. I know many photographers who would call this too ordinary or a cliché. Nonsense! The photographer recognized a great scene and gave us his personal intepretation of what he found. Another photographer would have likely produced a different viewpoint, or better said, a different point of view. I love the fact that the church is sandwiched against the distant hillside and that the tiny bit of shocking color on those trees, jumps out at us. Murray Robertson made the picture.1ChurchMurrayRobertson

Ian Plant has quickly become one of my favorite image makers. His landscapes are powerful and often come from an interesting or shocking point of view. Some are straight forward and informative in their beauty, and others are abstract in every sense.

Ian is also a great wildlife photographer. That tells me that while his landscape work is very artful, he isn’t a snob about image making. He is willing to capture the natural art of the wild world.

I have seen many images of Red Foxes or Coyotes jumping to make a hole in the snow to catch a mouse or vole they hear beneath that snow. This one is so pure in what it shows us, and so sharp and perfect, that I think it might be my personal favorite of all that I’ve previously seen.2Coyote-mousing-in-snowy-field-2,-Yellowstone-National-Park,-Wyoming,-USA IanPlant

I have come to learn that Ian also produces cityscapes and I love this black and white rendition of Minneapolis, Minnesota during a winter storm. This actualy has the feeling (my viewpoint from old newspaper pictures) of  1930s Chicago during a storm. I might actually label this picture a street scene rather than a cityscape. Either way, great job. Now if Ian would just start shooting macros.3Man-walking-across-street-in-snowstorm,-Minneapolis,-Minnesota,-USA IanPlant

Where photography is concerned I never forget the past. That might be because I am sort of a relic, as I began making serious pictures in 1971.

Veteran landscape star William Neill created this picture of a Giant Sequoia and Fir trees in California on 4×5 film, many years ago. In my opinion, everything about this image holds up today. The composition is flawless. Clean + simple = elegant and powerful.

Giant sequoia and fir tree in the fog, Sequoia National Park, California, 1993

Giant sequoia and fir tree in the fog, Sequoia National Park, California, 1993

Nature is an abstract artist. You just have to look down. These rock patterns are gorgeous in their natural expression, and thank you Jessica Winder for having the vision to look down and realize the beauty that was at your feet.5Rock surface Jessica Winder

Life is a diverse and adventuresome journey, and photography should be no less.

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Have a great day and may God Bless,                                                                                                   Wayne

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